COVID-19 case maps

San Francisco neighborhood maps of COVID-19 case rates.

Maps help us identify areas of San Francisco that have been most affected by COVID-19. We use this information to direct resources to those most affected. 

New cases map

This map shows new cases confirmed in San Francisco in the last 2 months.  

Neighborhoods with more new cases (higher new case rates) are darker blue. Neighborhoods with fewer new cases are lighter green.   

Neighborhoods not shaded on the map did not have 20 cases in the past 2 months. We only calculate rates when there have been 20 cases in the last 2 months. 

Data notes and sources

View source data

Data notes 

The map shows the rate of new COVID-19 cases. The new case rate is the number of cases from the last 60 days per 10,000 residents. Population estimates are from the 2019 American Community Survey (5-year estimates). 

Map updates daily. 

Some cases are missing a home address and cannot be mapped 

This means the number of cases shown on the map will not add up to the total number of cases in the City. 

We calculate rates when there are more than 20 new cases 

This is a standard practice to account for the Relative Standard Error. Areas with less than 20 new cases are blank on the map. 

Privacy protections 

We do not disclose the number of new cases if either of the following are true: 

  • There are fewer than 10 cumulative cases (since the beginning of the pandemic). 

  • The total resident population in the neighborhood is fewer than 1,000 people.  

We do not calculate case rates for these areas. These areas are not shown on the case rate map. 

Colors update to reflect data 

This map shades new case rates to highlight differences across the City. The map legend and colors are based on the distribution of the data. The data changes every day. The map legend may adjust as the data distribution changes. Because the map legend can change, you cannot compare past maps to each other or to current maps. 

Total cases map

This map shows all cases confirmed in San Francisco since testing began in late February.

Neighborhoods with more cases (higher case rates) are darker blue. Neighborhoods with fewer cases are light yellow. 

Data notes and sources

View source data

This rate is the total number of cases per 10,000 residents. Population estimates are from the 2019 American Community Survey (5-year estimates). 

Map updates daily. 

Some cases are missing a home address and cannot be mapped 

This means the number of cases shown on the map will not add up to the total number of cases in the City. 

Privacy protections 

We do not disclose the number of cases if either of the following are true: 

  • There are fewer than 10 cumulative cases.  

  • The total resident population in the neighborhood is fewer than 1,000 people.  

These areas are not shown on the map. 

Colors update to reflect data 

This map shades new case rates to highlight differences across the City. The map legend and colors are based on the distribution of the data. The data changes every day. The map legend may adjust as the data distribution changes. Because the map legend can change, you cannot compare past maps to each other or to current maps. 

Maps reflect institutional racism and structural inequality

COVID-19 has affected specific communities of color more than other groups. Learn more on our population characteristics page.

Neighborhood trends are closely linked to racism and inequality. This is, in part, because of discriminatory housing policies like redlining and urban renewal. 

Structural racism and discrimination impact many aspects of a person’s life, including: 

  • Housing conditions 

  • Job opportunities 

  • Health care access 

These can affect a person’s health. They can also increase a person’s risk of getting COVID-19. Find out more about health equity and COVID-19 risk factors. Other factors may also impact neighborhood trends, like the density of congregate housing. In congregate housing, bathrooms or kitchens are shared among more than one household. 

Differences in the neighborhood case rates does not mean that any area of the city is more or less safe.