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Funding plan for City College classes for older adults and adults with disabilities

Mayor London Breed and Board of Supervisors agreed funding, through Dignity Fund, to continue classes in CCSF’s Older Adults Program. Classes take place at San Francisco community centers, and were at risk as part of CCSF’s plan to address operating deficits.

San Francisco, CA — Mayor London Breed, Board President Norman Yee, and Supervisors Catherine Stefani, Ahsha Safaí, Aaron Peskin, and Rafael Mandelman today announced a plan to fund classes for older adults and adults with disabilities that were at risk of being cut as part of City College of San Francisco’s (CCSF) efforts to address ongoing operating deficits.

The plan will allow classes in CCSF’s Older Adults Program (OLAD) to continue by using resources from the Dignity Fund to leverage existing contracts with community-based organizations in order to continue 17 classes at 13 sites, which serves approximately 1,000 participants. Course activities include physical fitness, wellness, nutrition, language arts, art, and music appreciation. The anticipated annual cost of the classes is $216,000.

The Dignity Fund was passed by voters in 2016 and guarantees funding to enhance supportive services to help older adults and adults with disabilities age with dignity in their own homes and communities. The Department of Disability and Aging Services (DAS), which administers the Dignity Fund, is able to dedicate these resources for at least the next three years.

“City College is having to make some tough choices to address ongoing structural financial issues, and while that is happening we can lessen the impact for our seniors who visit our community centers to enrich their lives,” said Mayor Breed. “Many of our older adults rely on these classes, which keep them active and connected to the community, and I’m glad we’re able to find a way to ensure that they can continue.”

“Many of our older adults rely on these classes, which keep them active and connected to the community, and I’m glad we’re able to find a way to ensure that they can continue.” Mayor London Breed

Using available Dignity Fund revenue, DAS will provide funding to community-based organizations that currently host OLAD classes in order to allow them to continue. These courses are currently offered at senior and community centers throughout San Francisco. The organizations will assume responsibility for administering the classes from CCSF, including securing instructors, supervising curriculum, and managing student enrollment. The City will continue to explore other options for supplementing existing programs that serve the community.

“When we created the Dignity Fund, it was with the very intention to secure long-term funding to serve our seniors with quality programs. With the senior population on the rise, San Francisco cannot afford losing the limited services we have for our aging adults. I am proud that we are able to develop a collaborative approach leveraging existing resources and partnering with our community partners to bring their expertise in ensuring that these pivotal educational and recreational courses can continue serving residents throughout the city,” stated Supervisor Norman Yee, President of the Board of Supervisors. 

“These classes help keep older residents involved in their community, (and) benefit our City as well, by allowing us to draw on their experience, insight, and knowledge.” Shireen McSpadden, Executive Director of the Department of Disability and Aging Services

For over 20 years, non-profit organizations in San Francisco have partnered with CCSF to provide educational classes for older adults at community service centers throughout the City. Many participants are low-income and speak languages other than English. These courses supplement traditional senior center activities and services, including congregate meal and case management services funded by DAS.

“We are so pleased to be able to continue these classes for older adults that are so vital to so many,” stated Shireen McSpadden, Executive Director of the Department of Disability and Aging Services. “Not only are older adults San Francisco’s fastest growing age group, but they are living longer lives with more opportunities to remain engaged and active. These classes help keep older residents involved in their community, but also benefit our City as well, by allowing us to draw on their experience, insight and knowledge.”

To learn more about OLAD course offerings and to register, contact participating senior and community centers. Additional information on wellness and community engagement classes for older adults and adults with disabilities in San Francisco is available by calling the DAS Benefits and Resources Hub at (415) 355-6700.

CCSF OLAD courses will continue by leveraging Dignity Fund resources at the following locations:

  • 30th Street Senior Center (On Lok)
  • Aquatic Park Senior Center
  • Castro Senior Center
  • Jewish Community Center
  • Self-Help for the Elderly Senior Centers: Geen Mun, Jackie Chan, South Sunset, John King, West Portal Clubhouse
  • Stepping Sone Adult Day Health Centers: Mabini, Mission Creek, Presentation
  • YMCA Stonestown

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