Homelessness Recovery Plan

Mayor London N. Breed's Homelessness Recovery Plan invests in more housing and shelter.

Mayor London Breed’s two-year Homelessness Recovery  Plan (HRP) concluded on June 30, 2022. The Plan supported San Francisco’s work to:

 

  • Decrease homelessness by bringing more shelter and housing resources online. 

  • Help San Franciscans experiencing homelessness recover from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Homelessness Recovery Plan Overview

The Mayor’s Plan set several goals to expand housing and shelter resources between July 1, 2020, and June 30, 2022.

Targeted Plan Goals:

The Plan included four goals with targets for system expansion and placements.

  • Housing Expansion: Purchase or lease 1,500 new housing units (Goal B).

As of June 30, 2022, the City had nearly doubled this goal.

  • Shelter Expansion: Reach 2,100 adult and youth beds in the shelter system (Goal E).

  • Placements: Provide 6,000 housing and shelter placements (Goal A), including 3,000 placements to Permanent Supportive Housing (Goal C).  

We will continue to track progress on these key targeted goals on this page to guide our work. In 2023, HSH will publish a new citywide strategic plan that will builds on the HRP. The strategic plan will have new goals and a public dashboard to measure and report on progress.

Other Plan Goals

As part of the Plan, we also worked to increase resources by:

  • Expanding Rapid Rehousing, Problem Solving, and Prevention (Goal D)

  • Maintaining Safe Sleep, trailer, and Vehicle Triage Center programs (Goal F) 

This page includes information about the resources added through these programs during the Plan’s two-year period. Visit the HSH website for more information about these programs

Progress Towards Targeted Plan Goals

Get information about the City's work as of June 30, 2022, and our continued progress.

Housing Expansion (Goal B): Purchase or lease 1,500 new Permanent Supportive Housing units. 

Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) provides long-term affordable housing with services to people exiting homelessness. Housing is the solution to homelessness. 

When the Plan ended on June 30, 2022, the City had expanded the PSH portfolio by 2,918 units. We exceeded this goal by 95%.

This progress marks the largest expansion of PSH in the last 20 years.   

We are building on this goal by continuing to expand our Permanent Supportive Housing portfolio. The dashboard shows new housing inventory identified since July 2020. It includes units that are active or under contract. 

Data notes and sources

Data notes and sources

This dashboard includes units that are currently available for client placement under an interim model until master leases with non-profit providers are finalized. HSH anticipates that clients staying in these units will be able to sign leases and become PSH tenants in the coming months. 

  • Active” units are units that are already open and ready for placement.

  • Under Contract” units are still in the contracting stage. 

We also expanded other kinds of housing during the Homelessness Recovery Plan. The dashboard below shows new housing that opened between July 2020 and June 2022. It includes all types of housing (including PSH) for adults, families, and youth.  

Data notes and sources

Data notes and sources
  • “New site-based PSH units” includes units that are currently available for client placement under an interim model until master leases with non-profit providers are finalized. HSH anticipates that clients staying in these units will be able to sign leases and become PSH tenants in the coming months. 
  • In FY2021-22, HSH activated 125 slots of Short-Term Housing Assistance. Although these slots were activated in FY2020-21, clients were matched to longer-term housing interventions to better meet their needs and as such these slots are not tracked in this table. 

Shelter Expansion (Goal E): Operate 2,100 beds in the adult and youth shelter system by June 2022. 

The City's shelter system helps people experiencing homelessness by providing a temporary place to stay while seeking housing and accessing resources. Shelters are temporary; housing is permanent.  

After the COVID-19 pandemic started, the City reduced shelter capacity by nearly half at  congregate shelter sites, which have shared living spaces. We also had to stop accepting new guests for a period and move some guests to other shelters. These steps were life-saving public health decisions. However, this approach also meant fewer people could access shelter. 

As we shifted from response to recovery, the City worked to expand the adult and youth shelter system to 2,100 beds. However, we want to do more than reopen the shelter system as it was before COVID-19. Drawing on lessons from the Shelter-in-Place hotel program, we are opening new shelter models that offer private spaces for individuals and small groups instead of shared living spaces. Shelter expansion since July 2020 has included: 

  • New non-congregate shelter. 

  • New Navigation Centers

  • Reinflation of existing congregate shelter sites with COVID-19 safety precautions. 

When the Plan ended, the City had reached 78% of Goal E with 1,613 beds in the adult and youth shelter system.

Although the Plan is over, we will continue to track on our progress to expand the adult and youth shelter system. We are on track to expand shelter by approximately 1,000 new or reopened beds by the end of 2022. This dashboard shows the number of active adult and youth shelter beds in the shelter system.

Since July 2020, the City has also opened shelter programs outside the traditional shelter system that are not tracked in this dashboard. These resources include: 

  • The Bayview Vehicle Triage Center with space for 49 vehicles (planned expansion to about 130 spaces by the end of 2022).

  • Safe Sleep 

Placements: Provide 6,000 housing and shelter placements (Goal A), including 3,000 placements to Permanent Supportive Housing (Goal C).  

As of June 30, 2022, the City had made 4,679 placements to housing and shelter – 78% of the Plan’s goal.

When we created this plan, many people thought the pandemic would be over by June 30, 2022. This is not the case. As COVID-19 is still with us, the City has not been able to fully reopen our shelter system. We are working to expand shelter, housing, and other resources in line with COVID-19 health and safety guidance. Shelter and housing resources are opening each month and placements continue. The SIP Hotel Program was extended through fall 2022, so some SIP Housing placements will now happen after June 2022. 

We are continuing to track progress on this placement goal. The dashboard below counts:  

Data notes and sources

Data notes and sources

This dashboard includes client placements to units under an interim model until master leases with non-profit providers are finalized. HSH anticipates that clients staying in these units will be able to sign leases and become PSH tenants in the coming months. 

As part of those 6,000 placements, the City had a goal to place 3,000 people into Permanent Supportive Housing during the Plan period.  

As of June 30, 2022, the City had made 2,400 placements into Permanent Supportive Housing, reaching 80% of our goal. 

We will continue to track on this goal. This dashboard shows the number of placements of adults, youth, and families to PSH since July 2020, broken out by the type of housing

Data notes and sources

Data notes and sources

This dashboard includes client placement to units under an interim model until master leases with non-profit providers are finalized. HSH anticipates that clients staying in these units will be able to sign leases and become PSH tenants in the coming months. 

  • “New PSH” is placements to a PSH unit that the City purchased or leased in June 2020 or later. Some new PSH sites that we purchased or leased in 2021-2022 will start placements after June 30, 2022.

  • “Existing” is placements to a PSH unit that is already part of the inventory that someone moved into because it was vacated.  

Progress Towards Other Plan Goals

Learn about the City's progress as of June 30, 2022.

Expand Rapid Rehousing, Problem Solving, and Prevention resources (Goal D) 

Rapid Rehousing, Problem Solving, and Prevention provide temporary support. These programs help people exit homelessness or avoid it all together. The programs are for people who likely do not need permanent housing subsidies.  

The City expanded these resources to help approximately 1500 additional households exit or avoid homelessness, meeting the Plan’s goal.

The dashboard below shows the number of new resources opened between July 2020 and June 2022.

Over the last two years, all three of these resources have significantly expanded. More resources may be in the planning phases or recently funded but are not yet active. Visit the HSH website for more information about: 

  • Rapid Rehousing: medium-term rental assistance with services. 

  • Problem Solving: flexible interventions like move-in support and relocation assistance. 

  • Prevention: assistance for at-risk households, including financial help.

Maintaining Safe Sleep, trailer, and Vehicle Triage Center programs (Goal F) 

The City opened several new shelter models before and during the COVID-19 pandemic.  

  • Safe Sleep: People sleep in tents at a safe distance from each other at sites that are off the public sidewalk and offer services.  

  • Trailers: Another form of non-congregate shelter. 

  • Vehicle Triage Centers: Safe places for unhoused people living in their vehicles to stay and receive services.

We maintained these shelter models through the duration of the Homelessness Recovery Plan, meeting this goal.

Capacity of these sites as of June 30, 2022, is shown in the dashboard below.